Children’s Learning Garden

Children connect the theory of plant life cycles to experiential learning while harvesting radishes

The Children’s Learning Garden is home to a wide array of youth programming for students from pre-kindergarten through secondary school, with involvement ranging from 2-hour tours to interactive programming that runs throughout the school year. The student-built cob structure that frames the entrance to the Children’s Learning Garden is made of locally available natural materials and serves as a dynamic and inspiring medium for the farm’s educational programs. UBC Farm Children’s Programs include:

  • FarmDiscovery Tours
  • FarmWonders Spring and Summer Camp
  • Intergenerational Landed Learning Project
  • FarmDiscovery Tours

    Students on FarmDiscovery tours learn about farming and ecosystem stewardship

    Every fall and spring, the UBC Farm offers field trips and programming for children and youth groups ranging from preschool to secondary grade levels. These programs focus on a variety of issues that revolve around where food comes from, how we grow food, and the social, ecological, and community connections and responsibilities toward our shared food systems. FarmDiscovery Tours provide an opportunity for student groups to see a working organic farm, learn about organic farming techniques, and discuss important social and ecological aspects of human food production in our local area.

    For descriptions of the FarmDiscovery tours we offer and the specific BC Ministry of Education Prescribed Learning Outcomes (PLOs) that are covered on a tour, see the tours website.

    Register for Fall 2013 School FarmDiscovery Tours here.

    FarmWonders Spring and Summer Camp

    FarmWonders camp children engage in farm-to-fork activities such as gathering and preparing free-range eggs

    FarmWonders is an innovative and fun student-run community education initiative committed to promoting environmental awareness through science-based farm learning. Hosted in the Children’s Learning Garden, FarmWonders aims to offer a unique experience that allows children to explore the wonders of science at the farm and discover the mysteries of the food that they eat. For more information, please visit the FarmWonders website.

Intergenerational Landed Learning Project

An initiative of UBC’s Faculty of Education, the Intergenerational Landed Learning Project brings children to the UBC Farm for hands-on immersive and transformative learning experiences in the Children’s Learning Garden.

Landed Learning students develop skills in preparing garden-fresh foods with the guidance of adult mentors.

Under direct mentorship from faculty, seniors and UBC students, the children learn the practices of ecosystem stewardship, agriculture, health and nutrition, and integrate all elementary school subjects through land-based inquiry. Research elements of the project push the boundaries of pedagogical knowledge and have been widely disseminated in both academic literature and its “Get Growing” publication (pdf). The project has sprouted a suite of on-farm children’s programs, some working with Aboriginal students and elders, others running through the summer for seamless continuity all season. This model is being spread through the province in work with regional school districts, providing the opportunity to use innovative pedagogy to build environmental literacy in the next generation. To find out more about Landed Learning or to become involved as a volunteer, please visit the Project website.

Please also see the following short clip about Landed Learning, which was created as part of UBC’s Start an Evolution fundraising and alumni engagement campaign.

 

 

 

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Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at UBC Farm
3461 Ross Drive
Vancouver, BC, Canada
V6T 1W5
Tel 604-822-5092
Fax 604-822-6839
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